The Cape to Cape Trail

Pictou County

As one wanders through the heart of Nova Scotia, it is easy to forget that these trails were once used by pioneers as they brought mail, wares and other communications from village to village.

Durham Hill Trail

Enjoy a cross-country jaunt between the farming communities of Scotsburn and Durham. Follow the trail through a shady forest and along the border of an open field. Observe nature up close, view hills in the distance and rest beside a tranquil brook. And, make sure to take time to tour the village of Scotsburn where the recipe for ice cream was perfected and the village of Durham where the farmers have an unrivaled reputation for growing delicious strawberries.

 Distance: 8.0 kmDuration: approx. 2 hrsDifficultDetails

Fitzpatrick Mountain Trail

Take the "high road" between Millsville and Scotsburn. Hikers with a keen sense of adventure will be rewarded with scenery that makes this walk well worth the effort. From the summit (about 275 metres above sea level) there is an excellent view of the surrounding countryside and at the Stonehame Chalets (about 225 metres above sea level) there is a panoramic view of the Northumberland Strait and Prince Edward Island. Expect to find remains of the past on this historic trail that passes through the over-grown homesteads of our ancestors.

 Distance: 8.0 kmDuration: approx. 2 hrsDifficultDetails

Dalhousie Mountain Trail

This section of the Cape to Cape Trail follows the Old Dalhousie Mountain Road, from the Glen Road (adjacent to the border between Colchester County and Pictou County) to the Willis Cemetery which is about 3 km from Millsville. On the way you will pass the wind turbines on the summit of Dalhousie Mountain where the elevation is around 300 metres above sea level. From the Willis Cemetery the Cape to Cape Trail continues in an easterly direction on a dirt road that connects to a trail leading down the hill to the Six Mile Brook.

 Distance: 10.0 kmDuration: approx. 2 hrsDifficultDetails

Six Mile Brook Trail

There are three trail access points: 1) at the Six Mile Brook Road trail head parking lot/kiosk; 2) in Millsville on the Grant Road; 3) from the Willis Cemetery. Follow in the footsteps of the Highland settlers who used this route alongside the Six Mile Brook to travel to their homesteads on Dalhousie Mountain. You will find the names of these hardy pioneers inscribed on the gravestones in the Willis Cemetery at the end of the trail. On the Six Mile Brook Trail walkers will experience a difficult degree of physical challenge, while at the same time enjoying the beauty of the natural world.

 Distance: 10.0 kmDuration: approx. 3 hrsDifficultDetails